Germans vs. Greeks

This cracks me up every time. Nietzsche has just been booked for arguing with the referee, who is Confucius. He accuses Confucius of having no free will. Confucius say, Name go in box.

To his credit, Marx accurately calls Socrates’ goal off-sides. But it doesn’t matter anymore once the Greeks have won.

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    On Sunday, Greek voters will head to the polls to decide whether to endorse an austerity program that Europe demands the country put in place in exchange for continued financial assistance. If Greek voters say “yes,” the bailout will continue and Greece’s ruling party, Syriza, which strongly opposes the program, will likely step down from power. If voters say “no,” the bailout will end and Greece will may very well leave the euro zone, a bitter milestone in the currency union’s short history.

    The referendum is the culmination of years of tussling between Greece and Europe, though when we say Europe, we really mean Germany, the euro zone’s economic behemoth. Despite a crisis that has sometimes threatened the global economy — and maybe today, still does — Greece and Germany have just not been able to get along. Both certainly understand the ramifications: for Greece, years more of what has already become a Great Depression; and for Germany, its reputation as the linchpin of Europe.

    The Germans insist on a tough austerity program in order to continue aiding Greece. Syriza says it understands the need to get the country’s financial house in order, but demands the flexibility to do so in a way that it feels is right. Whether Greece’s voters have truly had enough of Germany’s mandates will be revealed Sunday. Here’s a guide to the data on why Germany and Greece are such different countries, among the factors that have made it difficult for them to see eye-to-eye on the most important questions facing Europe.

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